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Ice Age effects on Britain

britain-in-ice-age

Ice Age Britain

Our earliest thoughts when we think of primitive humans that have roamed this land of ours for thousands of years.  Is one of people, clothed in animal skins, with spear in hand, trekking across this land of ours, in search of food!

Ice Ages, have affected this land of ours, with deep sheets of ice, and have been here, long before the first human made his or her appearance.

The “Ice Age” that affected Britain, saw the Earth’s surface and atmosphere drop in temperature, and the polar ice sheets expand outwards from the north and south poles.  This caused much of Earth’s water to become trapped in ice sheets.

During this period Britain was joined with Ireland and Europe.  The connection with Ireland dissipated by 14,000 BC and with Europe around 5,600 BC.

When the Ice Age came to an end, the ice would slowly melt, and the oceans would return, and the sea levels would rise.  Coastlines would change, and so much of the coastal outlines would change, with the creation of new water areas, when before there was none.  Britain was connected to Europe by land mass, which has been replaced by the English Channel.

The last Ice Age came to an end in 10,000 BC, and nomads moved to the lands of Britain around 9,600 BC, and by 4,000 BC the island showed signs of a Neolithic culture inhabiting the island.

Planet Earth had received a respite from the Ice Age, but for how long?

If we look back at our history, Planet Earth could be millions of years old, and have been plunged into deep-cold Ice Ages many times over.  The warm weather would fade away, only to be replaced by cold weather winter and summer, which would be an indication of the return of an Ice Age.

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